Eco-DAS X Symposium Agenda

Sunday, 7 October

Participants arrive in Honolulu throughout the day
 
Welcome Reception at New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel

Monday, 8 October

Bus departs hotel for East-West Center
Refreshments and getting seated
Welcoming remarks, introductions
 
Paul Kemp, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai`i
A conversation about goals and strategies
 
David Garrison, US National Science Foundation
NSF and interdisciplinary, collaborative research
 
Ajit Subramaniam, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
 
Paul Kemp, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai`i
The thinking box

Ecosystem structure and organization

Darcy Taniguchi, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California – San Diego
The meaning of structure in planktonic communities in freshwater and oceanic systems
 
Hannes Peter, Department of Limnology, University of Vienna, Austria
Biodiversity-stability in aquatic ecosystems
 
Break
 
Gretchen Hansen, Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin - Madison
A comparison of the abundance distributions of invasive and native species
 
Kyle Cavanaugh, Earth Research Institute, University of California – Santa Barbara
Using social network tools to define and analyze marine metapopulations
 
Christopher Patrick, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Meta-ecosystem theory as a framework for understanding how changes to biodiversity at multiple spatial scales can affect ecosystem functions in aquatic ecosystems
 
Kelly L. Robinson, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, University of South Alabama
Gelatinous plankton in coastal pelagic food webs: effects of climate variability and future climate change on population abundances and distributions

Guest speaker and open discussion

Adrienne Sponberg, AquaticSci Communications
Science and the public

Ecosystem structure and organization - continued

Anna de Kluijver, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), The Netherlands
Human impact on carbon cycling in plankton food webs from micro- to global scale
 
Huan Chen, School of the Environment, Florida A&M University
Bacterial predators and their ecological implication in aquatic ecosystems
 
Claudia Dziallas, Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Microbial symbiotic interactions
 
Erin R. Graham, Biology Department, Temple University
Symbiosis in a changing planet: Is climate change shifting photosynthetic mutualisms?

Gnome-enabled ecology

Julie Koester, School of Oceanography, University of Washington
Assessing evolution in the ocean with respect to the eukaryotic phytoplankton
 
Beatriz Fernández Gómez, Marine Science Institute (ICM-CSIC), Barcelona, Spain
The ecology of marine flavobacteria
 
Lisa Zeigler Allen, Department of Microbial and Environmental Genomics, J. Craig Venter Institute
Viral ecology through genome enabled technology
 
John Kirkpatrick, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island
Gene transcription in the environment: What RNA does and doesn’t tell us
 
Brandi Kiel Reese, Marine and Environmental Biology, University of Southern California
Combining molecular microbiology and geochemistry to better understand microbial ecology in subsurface sediments
 
Review of progress and plans for tomorrow
 
Bus returns to hotel - dinner on your own!

Tuesday, 9 October

Bus departs hotel for East-West Center
Refreshments and getting seated
Announcements for the day

Guest speaker and open discussion

Romi Burks, Department of Biology, Southwestern University
Building a strong research shell: Development of an externally funded, international, undergraduate research program

Ecosystem health

Peter Levi, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University
Unifying metrics of aquatic ecosystem health for improved management (with Sarah Roley)
 
Sarah S. Roley, Biological Sciences, Notre Dame University
Unifying metrics of aquatic ecosystem health for improved management (with Peter Levi)
 
Brittany Huntington, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami
What drives variability in marine reserve performance?
 
Emily N. Henry, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University
Preserving lake littoral zone ecosystem services: prioritizing areas for management and conservation

Guest speaker and open discussion

Elisha Wood-Charlson, Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, Australia
Collaborative research: crossing barriers and finding opportunities

Connectivity

ay P. Zarnetske, Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies, Yale University
Integrating hydrological and ecological frameworks to quantify headwater DOM export across biomes and global change conditions
 
Melissa M. Baustian, Center for Water Sciences, Michigan State University
Benthic-pelagic coupling in aquatic ecosystems: identifying the mechanisms involved and the stressors that impact them
 
Xaymara M. Serrano, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami
Implications of larval dispersal and marine population connectivity for the resilience of coral reefs following disturbance
 
Stacy Beharry, National Science Foundation
Tracking fish survival using otolith chemistry: Why statistics matters

Ecology and the physical environment

Lauren E. Garske, Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California - Davis
Transport and impact potential of coastal runoff
 
Aaron True, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
The poster child for biophysical coupling in coastal marine ecosystems: thin layers
 
Jason M. Smith, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University
Nitrification in coastal upwelling systems
 
David Murphy, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
Scaling up sensory ecology: linking the hydrodynamics of plankton behavior to ecosystem processes
 
Talina Konotchick, J.C. Venter Institute
Integration of molecular approaches to studying physical-biological interactions

Chapter development time I

Time to talk with possible collaborators about chapters
Reach across boundaries! Think outside the box!
 
Open discussion, review of progress, and plans for tomorrow
Bus returns to hotel; Dinner on your own!

Optional evening event: Chocolate Meets Science!

This fun event will be held in the San Souci Room, New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel. Guest speaker Romi Burks will provide a brief presentation on an academic’s view of her favorite non-academic subject: Chocolate! We will then have a chocolate tasting led by Dylan Butterbaugh, CEO/Owner of Manoa Chocolate, a beans-to-bar artisan chocolate company. Cost: $25 per person.

Wednesday, 10 October

Bus departs hotel for East-West Center
Refreshments and getting seated
Announcements for the day

Environmental change

Cayelan Carey, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University
The complex and synergistic interactions between increasing dissolved organic carbon, harmful algal blooms, and climate on aquatic ecosystems (with Kevin Rose)
 
Kevin Rose, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
The complex and synergistic interactions between increasing dissolved organic carbon, harmful algal blooms, and climate on aquatic ecosystems (with Cayelan Carey)
 
Beth A. Stauffer, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Ecological issues in the coastal zone: Challenges to studying eutrophication, algal blooms and hypoxia
 
Steven Sadro, Earth Research Institute, University of California – Santa Barbara
Environmental control of aquatic ecosystem metabolism: Predicting effects in response to a changing climate
 
Lesley Knoll, Lacawac Sanctuary, Pennsylvania
Linking watershed features, biogeochemical cycling, and climate change
 
Jennifer Griffiths, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Using a meta-ecosystem framework to characterize the responses of aquatic ecosystems to climate change

Chapter development time II

Working break -­- more time to talk with potential co-­-authors!

Guest speaker and open discussion

Camilo Mora, Department of Geography, University of Hawaii
Global patterns, processes, threats and conservation of marine biodiversity

Guest panel and open discussion

Dave Garrison, Ajit Subramaniam, Michael Cooney
Discussion: The implicit partnership between private and government funding sources

Chapter development time III

Lydia Baker, University of Hawai`i
Group dynamics and strategies
 
Breakout session to discuss ideas for collaborative chapters
Goal: try to finalize your ideas for collaborative chapters
 
Refreshments available at 3:00 PM, keep working!
 
Chapter ideas on the board
Reconvene to construct a list of tentative ideas for chapters
 
Bus returns to hotel: Dinner on your own!

Thursday, 11 October

Bus departs hotel for East-West Center
Refreshments and getting seated
Announcements for the day

Open discussion

Identify cross-­-cutting themes observed in the presentations.
What are the most important topics?
What would you like to talk about this morning?

Working groups: Breakthrough science

What has never been done before, but might be possible?
Predict the future! Where will the breakthroughs come from?
 
Status
Has it been described well in the open literature?
Why is this exciting?
Where are the biggest, boldest opportunities?
Challenges
What resources are available?
What are the main obstacles to this work?
What partnerships need to exist?
What funding investments need to be made?
What training is needed?
After lunch: 5-minute reports on the top 3 predictions from each group!
Bus returns to hotel

Your assignment for the afternoon

Working groups:
Presentation writers prepare brief (10-­-15 min) presentations for Saturday, describing conclusions and recommendations of your working group. Please get input from your working group members.
 
Author teams:
Who will you need on your author team? Find them! Which ideas are most interesting to the team? Take notes! Reminder: realistically, you can lead one chapter and participate in another.

Friday, 12 October

Bus departs hotel for East-West Center
Refreshments and getting seated
Announcements for the day
 

Panel discussion: the perfect career

Do you have what you need to succeed? Are you planning your career or just experiencing it? Is there only one true path to success? Have you thought about alternatives? Will you be happy with your choices? What is the perfect career?
 
Panelists will offer very brief (5-10 min) informal presentations about the reasons, rewards and challenges of career choices they have made. Feel free to interrupt, ask questions, express your opinions, and share your own experiences.
 
Moderator: Paul Kemp, University of Hawai`i
Adrienne Sponberg, AquaticSci Communications
Camilo Mora, University of Hawai`i
Romi Burks, Southwestern University
Elisha Wood-­-Charlson, Australian Institute of Marine Science
Debbie Bronk, Virginia Institute of Marine Science and NSF

Chapter development (rest of the day)

Finalize AUTHORS and identify TEAM LEADERS,
Select a TITLE,
Prepare a detailed OUTLINE and ROUGH DRAFT
Evaluate the ESTIMATED TIME to 1st DRAFT, and
 
Prepare a brief (10 min) PRESENTATION for tomorrow
How are your research interests complementary?
Why does this chapter need to be written?
What are your ideas for future collaboration?
Author teams: sign up for a presentation time slot!
 
Review of progress and plans for tomorrow
First bus returns to hotel
Second bus for those who wish to join the TGIF social event
Dinner on your own!

Saturday, 13 October

Bus departs hotel for East-West Center
Refreshments and getting seated
Announcements for the day
 
Working groups
15-minute presentations and discussion
 
Author teams
10-minute presentations of proposed chapters

After author teams have completed their presentations, we will discuss target dates and rules for the manuscripts. The symposium will then be adjourned.

Farewell gathering at East-West Center
 
Bus returns to hotel